An Ordinary Guy

Kellie Elmore’s Free Write Friday prompt this week suggested we look in the mirror then write a story about what we see there. The following is what I saw:

An Ordinary Guy 

When I looked in the mirror this morning, I saw an ordinary guy who looks a little bit like his grandpa. But then… I saw a crowd gathering behind me.

I saw my grandpa; he was smiling as he walked up and stood beside me. I do look like him, but it wasn’t the physical resemblance I saw; I saw a man I admired, and I saw all the things he’d instilled in me as I watched him during the years he’d been a part of my life. His work ethic, honesty, loyalty, kindness toward others, and most of all, the way he loved my grandma. He took care of her right up to her last days, and though he might have, I never heard him complain. He was my role model when it came to being a man, and I hope I’m like him.

I saw my Mom; she was smiling even bigger than her dad, and I think I saw pride in her eyes as she took her place at my side. She reinforced the things my grandpa taught me, and added some to the list; most of all she showed me what unconditional love is, and made sure I was introduced to Jesus early on. She has been the most influential person in my life, and if you can see my heart when you look at me, you see my mother.

Then I saw my wonderful wife, Sherry; she came and stood behind me, putting her hands on my shoulders so as to hold me to the ground. You see, with her in my life, I sometimes feel like I can fly. I’ve heard it said married couples begin to resemble their mate after a time, so if you look at me and see patience, unwavering love, devotion and all the many good things she is; then I suppose I have come to resemble her a bit. I hope so.

I watched then as a multitude of others gathered behind me; brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, uncles, and relatives of every kind. Friends were there, and there were people I hardly knew, and many whom I had no idea who they were. Their number was infinite, and seemed to go for miles behind me. I knew somehow each of these people from my past had touched me and helped to mold me into the person I am.

This man in the mirror had been touched by, and had touched, thousands—maybe even millions—of people during his walk through this life. He’d hurt some, and been hurt by some; he’d forgiven most and the reverse he hoped was true.

The crowd behind me began to fade, and I smiled, deciding I feel pretty good about who I am. I know I’m not perfect, and never will be, but I know I’m who I am, what I am, and where I am, because this is who, what and where God wants me to be at this moment in time. The past has passed, the future is in His hands, and now is the only thing I need be concerned with.

Yep. I look in the mirror and I see this ordinary guy that looks a little bit like his grandpa. That’s all.

 

Copyright © 2011 C. Mashburn

20 Comments »

  1. terri0729 said

    Great job Charlie!! MOST excellent post and self-review, yesterday I couldn’t get passed the physical long enough to do the inside, lol! It was just one of those days I guess. And, by the way, I do believe Mark when he says it and I tell him back that as long as he thinks I am, that’s all that matters to me anyway 🙂 Blessings and love to you & Sherry, Terri

  2. booguloo said

    Well done!

    • Thanks for the visit and comment, Boog! Haven’t seen you around for a while?

  3. “Then I saw my wonderful wife, Sherry; she came and stood behind me, putting her hands on my shoulders so as to hold me to the ground. You see, with her in my life, I sometimes feel like I can fly.”…

    I love that, Charles. It’s funny, how we see those who we grew up with in ourselves. I catch myself sometimes using phrases my grandma used and wringing my hands the way she did when she was anxious. So, after they are gone, we keep a little part of them with us afterall.

    Thank you for once again partaking in my FWF. Your loyalty means so much to me. I had thought about not doing it anymore but, if I can inspire but one person to write something, I am happy. Thank you for that!

    Hugs! xox
    Kellie

    • You’re welcome for my participation, kellie. I love it, because, as you may have noticed, I love to write, and you inspire me to try different things. Have you checked into using the linx system some of the poetry sites use for submissions? I think that might get more people to participate.
      Thanks for your comments on my story!

      • I thought the same thing, Charles…in reference to the Links systems. I did in fact check into them but the ones I found, you have to pay in order to customize them to your own blog, otherwise it will allow linking in from other sites as well. Of course maybe I just “don’t get it” and am confused with the whole thing which is quite possible lol!

        I really wish I could get a little more participation and I honestly do not see the need for the system (links) when you can post the link in the reply section, but it does seem to draw in a crowd for some reason?! Maybe I should just promote it a bit more? I don’t know, but even with just the few loyal participants I get each week, truly makes it worth while. Thanks for that, Charles! I appreciate your consistency.
        Happy Holidays to you and yours! xox
        Kellie

      • I certainly don’t get it either! I barely get the simple stuff I do. I just figured it might be a way to get more folks to participate. But, I also agree with your feelings that it’s okay as is.
        Merry Christmas to you and yours, too!

  4. Great job!! Such a marvelous look into your mirror!

  5. This needed a ♥. button…

    I agree with Kellie on “Then I saw my wonderful wife, Sherry; she came and stood behind me, putting her hands on my shoulders so as to hold me to the ground. You see, with her in my life, I sometimes feel like I can fly.”…this struck a cord…altho I’ll never get to have that wonderful experience, even after two marriages, I felt joy that you have and do. How wonderful.
    You gave me lots to think about as to what I might be able to see if I honestly look in the mirror.

    “This man in the mirror had been touched by, and had touched, thousands—maybe even millions—of people during his walk through this life. He’d hurt some, and been hurt by some; he’d forgiven most and the reverse he hoped was true.”
    This is wonderful. It is amazing how many people we touch directly and indirectly in our lives and in so many ways. Even people on the street who may observe us in some ways. I once was told by a visitor at the nursing home that the ladies granddaughter, about 8, was walking down the hall with her hands in her sweater pockets and she said to the lady,
    when asked about this, “I’m going to be a nurse someday, and this is how Miss Sigrid walks.”

    There’s so much more you brought to the surface of my memories…so
    thank you very much.
    Peace
    Siggi in Downeast Maine

    • Ps…the typo last paragraph is “Miss Sigrid” sorry…didn’t catch it soon enough

      Sigrid

    • Again, Siggi, your words are wonderful and so very much appreciated.
      I don’t know why you think it’s too late to experience the kind of love Sherry and I share. This is not our first rodeo, and we met in our mid-forties. Also, a good friend of mine said basically the same thing you’ve said about three years ago. I encouraged her to not give up, and today (she’s 60) she is very happily married to one of her childhood sweethearts. Never say never.
      As for touching people, it is a humbling experience when we begin to realize how our actions and words affect others.
      You’ve made my day with your comments, Miss Sigrid. Thank you very very much!

  6. Andy said

    Hello.
    I don’t know what it is, but I think you & I are a lot alike in heart. The part about your wife, well that’s exactly how I feel about my own wife. It’s funny how two do indeed become one. Spoken from the heart, Charles, & that’s what I admire & respect about you.
    Never change who you are my friend.
    Thanks for sharing.

    • I think the thing that makes us much alike is that we are in love with love, and wear it on our respective sleeves. I bare it all when I write, and I see the same in your poems.
      Thanks for the visit and comment, Andy!

  7. I love this short story … especially the last lines:

    “[…] I feel pretty good about who I am. I know I’m not perfect, and never will be, but I know I’m who I am, what I am, and where I am, because this is who, what and where God wants me to be at this moment in time. […]”

    Thank you for sharing.

    Namaste

  8. Mary said

    Thank you for sharing this link with me this morning after having read my poem “Secrets.” Ah yes, I sometimes see my mother when I look in the mirror too. Sigh. And I do agree that people tend to resemble each other after a while; and hopefully EACH develops the good characteristics of the other and not the less desireable.

    I like these words:

    “This man in the mirror had been touched by, and had touched, thousands—maybe even millions—of people during his walk through this life. He’d hurt some, and been hurt by some; he’d forgiven most and the reverse he hoped was true.”

    True of many of us as well (well I don’t know about millions and me..LOL) And yes, we’ve all hurt people and been hurt by them. I told each of my daughters a few times, “I might have made a few mistakes, but whatever I did I did out of love.” And I like to think that is true of most close people in one’s life.

    Hope you will visit my blog again, as I will visit yours.

    • I said millions, because I don’t think we realize the wave effect of the impressions we leave in this world. We touch one, the one touches another, and on and on. I truly believe that we are all more interconnected than we realize. Though it hasn’t always been true, I nw see this as a call to leave the “right” impression on those I come in contact with.
      I am subscribing to your blog, so, yes, I will be visiting often!
      Thank you very much for the wonderful comment!

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